My Angry Rant to Adults:

Sue Shellenbarger

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Adults, parents, and teachers never understand the point of getting to know the children around them, because that is all they are, children.  I’m a teenager, so I must be the same as every other teenager on the planet; I probably have the same values, ideas, beliefs, struggles, and thoughts as them, am I right?  My “little” teenage problems do not matter in the big picture, because everyone has the same ones.  The adults in my life, they don’t want to hear it.  I’m just another kid; I’m barely old enough to count; barely even a real human yet, so I must not know a thing.

Adults are far too quick to lump us adolescents together in one universal category of “bad-mouthing, disrespectful, dumb as dirt teenager” – The stoners, the bandies, the jocks and the over-achievers.  We are all just hormone-crazed, party animal, unintelligent kids’ right?    We are barely even there.  The adults believe we do not want to listen to them, but I have found out it is them who do not want to listen to us.  Us, with our teenage voices, and their thoughts too loud; we get drowned out.

In my opinion, our generations of teens are smarter than half the adult population.  They grew up in a time where you could live without fear when riding your bike down a city street.  Mothers stayed at home and raised their kids; they did not work.  People spoke of morals and religion.  Front doors were left unlocked into the hours of the night, and MTV was for ages 18 and up.  Teachers cared about their students, and no one knew what heroin was.

We, teens, are growing up in a world none of them could have fathomed; an almost opposite world to the one they grew up in; filled with drugs, rape, shady business, unsafe streets and chaos.  We are conditioned to be able to handle these things though, therefore, having a greater understanding.

Because of the world we grew up in, teens are stronger, and understand aspects of life we had to learn in order to grow at a very young age. So what if we don’t know the cosine of 90 degrees, or the year that Ben Franklin was born, that doesn’t make us lesser, or stupid. Maybe if the adults would open their ears and listen, they would know that too.

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